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Nouns

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Nouns

There are FOUR KINDS OF NOUNS –

COMMON Nouns,

PROPER Nouns,

COLLECTIVE  Nouns and

ABSTRACT Nouns.

 

Examples of Nouns

 

A COMMON NOUN

refers to any  one of a number of things of the same kind, such as as:  “man”, “country”, “lake” or “cloud”.  “Common” comes from a Latin word meaning “shared by several”.

 

A PROPER NOUN

is a name for one particular thing.  “Proper” comes from a Latin word meaning “own”.   (Think of property;  somebody owns the property.)  Thus a Proper noun can be given to only one thing at a time; it is an owned name.  A Proper noun begins with a capital letter, as “John”, “Australia”.

 

A COLLECTIVE NOUN 

is a name for a group of similar things,  the group forming one complete whole.  Example:  “There are many sheep in the field but there is only one flock of sheep.”  In this sentence sheep is a Common noun, because it may stand for any one and every  one sheep, but flock is a Collective noun, as it stands for all the sheep at once, and not for any one sheep  on its own.

 

An ABSTRACT NOUN

is the name given to something which has no substance, that is, to something which  cannot be seen, heard, touched, smelled or tasted.  Examples are “poverty”,  “humility”,  “goodness”,  “laughter” and “hardness”.

 

            We know that a stone is hard.  We know that iron is hard.  We know that a brick is hard.  We can speak of hardness as being a quality apart from the stone, the iron, and the brick, or any other object having the same quality.  We can put our hands on the stone, the iron and  the brick,, but there is nothing to see or touch when we think of hardness.  We can go to the store and buy some stones or bricks or iron, but we cannot buy any hardness  as it does not exist.  We can think of stones and iron and bricks as having substance, whereas hardness has no substance.  So, hardness is called an abstract noun.

            Other examples are:  childhood, kingship, service, sight, fear, hope - and so on

 

The following words are all nouns, as they refer to the names of PERSONS:

Tom. Dick. Harry, Jenny, Joan, Jean, Kenneth, William, Thomas, Ronald, Rita, Reg.

These nouns all begin with a capital letter, which shows they  are owned by somebody; they refer to a particular person, not just to anyone in general.

 

Words such as   man, woman, boy, girl, lad, lass, child, baby, person, people, are also nouns, but they are not owned by any particular person; the names are common to many people.  So these words are all common nouns.

           

Note especially that the names are words, not persons.  It is the words that are nouns, not the persons.

 

The following words are all nouns as they refer to the names of PLACES:

Perth,  Adelaide,  Midland, Stratton, Australia, Holland,  England, America, Timor.

 

Note that these nouns all begin with a capital letter.  This indicates that they are all owned names.  So they are all Proper nouns.

 

But words such as river, mountain, lake, road, street, town, country, village, city are names that belong to any number of such things, or places; they are common to many things.  So they are all called Common nouns.

 

Words such as  hill, tree, river, bank, house, table, chair, knife, spoon, eggs, hens, bed, cat, dog, are all nouns as they are the names of THINGS.  These names are common to a great many such things, so they are called Common nouns.

 

But names such as Swan River, Commonwealth Bank, Mount Everest,  Morrison Road, are Proper nouns, as the names refer to particular things;  they are owned names.

 

The following words are all nouns because they refer to the names of THINGS.

They are all nouns; each one names something:   chair, table, dishes, computer, knife, meal, car, dog, garden, cloud, flower, tree.  These names are all called Common nouns.

 

EXERCISE

1.  Read through the following paragraph. Then underline the nouns.  (There are 15 nouns altogether.)

 

            Once upon a time, Hans Hannekemaaier, with a scythe on his back, came into the land near Edam Town where they make cheeses.  How he stared his eyes out!  The meadows were so lush and green, and the cows so big,  The farmers, long pipes in their mouths, were strolling about the fields with a lordly air.

 

Now make a list of all the nouns and beside each one write what kind of a noun it is – Common noun, (Common nouns are everywhere, and you use them all the time, even if you don’t realize it. Wherever you go, you’ll find at least one common noun. Street, closet, bathroom, school, mall, gas station; all of these places are named using common nouns).

People in general are named using common nouns, though their official titles or given names are proper nouns. When we refer to people using common nouns, we use words like teacher, clerk, police officer, preacher, delivery driver, boyfriend, girlfriend, grandma, cousin, and barista.

Collective nouns  You might not know it, but you encounter collective nouns in everyday speech. Collective nouns are words for single things that are made up of more than one person, animal, place, thing, or idea. You can’t have a team without individual members; even so, we discuss a team as a single entity.

http://www.gingersoftware.com/content/grammar-rules/nouns/collective-nouns/

Abstract nouns are words that name things that are not concrete. Your five physical senses cannot detect an abstract noun – you can’t see it, smell it, taste it, hear it, or touch it. In essence, an abstract noun is a quality, a concept, an idea, or maybe even an event.

Abstract nouns and concrete nouns are usually defined in terms of one another. Something that is abstract exists only in the mind, while something that is concrete can be interacted with in a physical way. Qualities, relationships, theories, conditions, and states of being are some examples of the types of things abstract nouns define.

http://www.gingersoftware.com/content/grammar-rules/nouns/abstract-nouns/

 

Two of the nouns are worked for you.

      Noun                           Kind of Noun

1.  time                                          Abstract noun

2.  Hans Hannekemaaier  Proper noun

Examples of Nouns

Abstract Nouns name things you can’t perceive with your five senses

advice

anger

belief

bigotry

communication

compassion

darkness

death

fear

freedom

friendship

gratitude

happiness

hatred

help

heroism

history

honesty

hope

infancy

jealousy

knowledge

life

love

loyalty

manhood

misery

peace

pride

poverty

power

promise

reality

redemption

regret

religion

troupe

trust

wealth

wisdom

Collective Nouns a group of people or things

army

audience

band

bevy

bouquet

brood

bunch

caravan

cartload

choir

clan

colony

congregation

corps

drove

family

flock

gaggle

gang

group

herd

jury

mob

pack

panel

range

regiment

school

squadron

swarm

team

village

Compound Nouns made up of two or more words

aftermath

anyone

blackboard

board of directors

bodyguard

court-martial

daughter-in-law

earthworm

eyeglasses

father-in-law

forget-me-not

grandfather

grasshopper

homemade

inside

jellyfish

jigsaw

keyboard

kneecap

lifetime

moonlight

mother-in-law

New York

overthrow

paperclip

photograph

pickpocket

pigtails

plaything

quicksand

railroad

rattlesnake

somewhere

snowflake

sunlight

tablecloth

upstream

uplift

wheelchair

windpipe

Countable Concrete Nouns can be perceived with your five senses and can be counted

aardvark

banana

bed

bird

book

cat

clock

cookie

country

dog

eyes

flowers

house

light

match

movie

ocean

panther

pen

phone

photograph

planet

rain

speaker

sun

suitcase

sunset

train

ukulele

violin

walnuts

xylophone

Uncountable Concrete Nouns cannot be counted

air

beer

blood

butter

cheese

clutter

currency

economics

electricity

flour

food

garbage

gas

ground

homework

honey

information

insurance

juice

lightning

milk

mud

music

news

rain

rice

sand

snow

timber

water

weather

wood

Verbal Nouns (Gerunds) refer to actions

acting

asking

boating

bowling

camping

climbing

crawling

dancing

deceiving

destroying

eating

fishing

flying

golfing

growing

hiking

hopping

hunting

hurting

inserting

jogging

jumping

kayaking

living

making

moaning

naming

opening

painting

parasailing

placing

plotting

questioning

razing

rollerblading

rolling

running

shopping

skiing

smoking

snorkeling

surfing

swimming

talking

traveling

watching

watering

yodeling

Proper Nouns – name a particular person, place or thing

Africa

Atlantic Ocean

Australia

Beethoven

Big Ben

Chile

Clark Gable

Conoco

Disneyland

Elizabeth Taylor

Fluffy

Halley’s Comet

Honda

January

Jupiter

King Tut

Lake Eerie

La-Z-Boy

Minnesota

Michael

Minnesota

Mount Everest

Nelson Mandela

Notre Dame

Peking

Quebec

Rio Grande

Rocky Mountains

September

Stanford University

Starbucks

Susan

The New York Times

The Tower of London

Uncle George

United Nations

United States

Vincent van Gogh

Xerox

Zeus

 

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During my Digital Media, Multimedia and some AIT or VET courses I got my students to work on The S.T.E.A.M.E.R book of knowledge, especially advanced students that complete tasks ahead of time, this was my fall back lessons for those clever or advanced students, they were asked to pick one of the areas of study and create a cover page, find some interesting facts and put their findings into a chapter of the book The book was 138 pages long at my retirement from teaching.

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STEAMER Stands for

Science, Technology, English, Arts, Mathematics, Enivironment and Religion

resources

For those students that presented work on English we gathered a lot of useful reference information that became a STUDENT's COMPENDIUM here are some samples of student work

Explanation for Compendium
File Includes
ANU - Australian National University
An acronym is a pronounceable word formed from the first letter (or first few letters) of each word in a phrase or title. Sometimes, the newly combined letters create a new word that becomes a part of everyday language. An example of this is the acronym radar.
Adjectives are words that describe or modify other words * Priest = Sacerdotal
Apes - gibber, Camel live in Australia, Sahara & Arabia names = Bull - is called a heifer
Opposites = Absent - present
SC005_Big_Words for small
Anger - Dudgeon * bold - Audacious
A partner in crime - accomplice
A passage between the pews in a church - Aisle
SC007_Commonly_confused_words
Council, an administrative or advisory body, do not confuse with counsel, advice or guidance. Homonyms
Aberdeen - The Granite City The Torrid Zone has the hottest climate Zinc - Mexico, U.S.A., Spain
SC013 Death Words pertaining to Occurring after death - posthumous
SC009_Diminutives
Cask - casket   
SC010_Famous
Matthew Flinders -discovered Bass Strait. * Lord Robert Baden-Powell founded the Boy Scouts in 1908
SC011_Figurative_Expressions
Aloof -To keep to oneself and not mix with others.
SC012_Gender
Actor - Actress
SC013_Geography The Circumference of the earth is approxinmately 24,800 miles.
SC014_Gods War - Mars
SC015_Government Australian Government
SC016_Grammar Explains various uses of nouns verbs etc.
SC017_Human_Relationships THE ART OF LIVING - Consideration for the feelings of others
SC018_Inventions Clock (pendulum) - Christian Huygens
SC019_Kings_Queens of UK EGBERT 827 - 839
SC020_Literary A book in which the events of each day are recorded - Diary
SC021_Marriage A hater of marriage - misogamist
SC022_Medical A disease confined to a particular district or place - endemic
SC044_Metaphors Metaphor is a figure of speech that makes an implicit, implied, or hidden comparison between two things that are unrelated
SC023_Miscellaneous All Fools' Day - 1st April - Aussie slang - sounds that things make etc.
SC024_Nouns sit - seat (when to use Nouns)
SC025_Names Boys & Girls names explained
SC026_Nature A four-footed animal - quadruped
SC027_Negatives That which cannot be pierced or penetrated - impenetrable
SC028_Numbers A number of fish taken in a net - catch, haul
SC029_Opposites Unable to read - il-literate
SC030_Patron Saints St. George of England, St. Andrew of Scotland
SC031_Places A place where fishes are kept - aquarium
SC032_Possessive_Case Is the case which denotes the owner or possessor
SC045_Phobias Noctiphobia - Fear of the night
SC033_Professions The commander of a fleet - Admiral
SC034_Similes Archates - a good friend * Belt = to hit below the belt
SC035_Proverbs A bad beginning makes a good ending.
SC048_Sayings as a drowned rat. - as ancient as the sun—as the stars.
SC036_Science_and_Arts An instrument for detecting earthquakes - seismograph
SC037_Scientific_Terms The science of land management - agronomics
SC038_Seven_Wonders The Pyramids of Egypt
SC039_Synonyms abandon....... desert, forsake, leave.
SC040_War Nations carrying on warfare - belligerents
SC041_Weddings 7th year—Copper or Brass
SC042_Words_to_Verbs strong - strengthen
SC043_Other Any other items that might be of interest
SC044_Metaphors Metaphor is a figure of speech that makes an implicit, implied, or hidden comparison between two things that are unrelated
SC045_Phobias Noctiphobia - Fear of the night
SC046_Death
Occurring after death - posthumous
SC047_Thesaurus

Thesaurus - abandon = abandoned, abandoning, abandonment, abandons affluent =having an abundant supply of money or possessions of value,words explained and incorrect use of words

SC048_Sayings as afraid as a grasshopper.
SC049_UrbanMyths The floor was dirt.  Only the wealthy had something other than dirt, hence the saying "dirt poor." 

Please note there are some excellent links to assist with these pages

see at the end for the links for further information. 

 

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Abbreviations divider Acronyms divider Animals divider Antonymns divider Big Words for Small Words divider Characteristics divider Church divider Countries Cities

divider Death divider Diminutives divider Famous divider Figurative Expressions divider Gender divider Geographical divider Gods and Goddesses divider Government divider Grammar and Syntaxdivider  Human Relationships divider Inventions divider Kings and Queens divider Literary Sentences divider Marriage divider Medicaldivider Metaphors divider Miscellaneous divider Nouns divider Names divider Nature divider Negatives divider Numbers divider Opposites divider Patron Saints divider Places divider Possessive Case divider Phobiasdivider Professions divider Proverbs divider Science & Arts divider Scientific Termsdivider Seven Wonders divider Similies dividerThesaurus divider Synonyms divider War Words divider Wedding divider Words to Verbs divider Other divider Home

 

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Page last updated 2nd March 2020