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Week Start

 

Link 2 is a history of the Titanic

 

This is a 1:250 wood model by Hatchette being built by Peter Faulks & Dave Parkes

 

 

 

Week 21. This is where it all starts for me Dave has built the main hull components. The bits I received were 100 magazines none opened after 22, part of the model and one open packet 23 for the stern plates (wooden slats)

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Build

I am using this site to help it is an excellent page full of advice

There are 100 magazines each with small parts to build the Titanic week by week

Here is our journal about this build

 

I purchased a plastic box to hold the magazines we are up to 22 and I have all 100 copies.

 

mags

This Week The Start

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Building the Titanic Week by Week
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The magazine has instructions on the rear of each issue but you need a lot of know how just to put in place what is required.

I received the ship with the main hull built by Dave and started on the mid section using pieces from Magazine 22

 

I made a crude cardboard box to hold the ship when not working on it, I put a sheet of protection rubber sheeting over the decks to help keep them from getting damaged, the deck already had some slight damage that I repaired.

box

 

 

 

About the Titanic

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The Titanic a great ship tragedy

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Why Did the Titanic Sink? High speeds, a fatal wrong turn, cut costs, weather conditions, a dismissed key iceberg warning and lack of binoculars and lifeboats all contributed to one of the worst maritime tragedies.

The Titanic Deck

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The Titanic Poster

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An estimated 100,000 people gathered at the dock in Belfast, Ireland on March 31, 1911, to watch the launch of the Royal Mail Ship (RMS) Titanic. Considered to be an “unsinkable” ship, Titanic was the largest and most luxurious cruise liner of its day, measuring more than 882 feet long from prow to stern—the length of four-city blocks—and 175 feet high, and weighing more than 46,000 tons. It boasted state-of-the-art technology, including a sophisticated electrical control panel, four elevators and an advanced wireless communications system that could transmit Morse Code.

 

sailing

 

Section 2 is a History of the Titanic

 

Go to Section 21

 

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Updated by

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Peter J Faulks

 

Updated 11April 2021